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Patient education is an important part of our mission

We are here to help you better understand your treatment journey. Below you can find answers to frequently asked questions and a list of commonly used terms that you may hear when learning about KIMMTRAK and metastatic uveal melanoma.

Is KIMMTRAK an option for me?

Ask your doctor about getting a simple blood test to determine if KIMMTRAK may be right for you.

FAQs

Where will I go to get my treatments?

Talk with your doctor about locations where KIMMTRAK will be administered that will be best for you. KIMMTRAK is administered once weekly. KIMMTRAK CONNECT® is prepared to work with you and your care team to help coordinate appointments.

What if I need help getting to and from my KIMMTRAK infusions?

Your dedicated nurse case manager can help investigate affordable transportation options in your area.

Do I need to be monitored after treatment?

When you receive KIMMTRAK, your healthcare team will watch you for at least 16 hours after you are given each of the first 3 doses. After the first 3 doses, if you tolerated KIMMTRAK well, you will be watched for a minimum of 30 minutes after each dose.

Monitoring takes place in a healthcare setting, so you are not required to bring someone else with you in order to receive KIMMTRAK.

Will my insurance cover KIMMTRAK?

While some insurance plans will cover KIMMTRAK, some may not. Your dedicated nurse case manager will help you find out what is covered by your insurance. They can also tell you about programs that may help if you do not have insurance or do not have enough insurance.

I am going to be traveling for vacation. How can I make sure I don't miss a treatment?

There are infusion centers across the country where you can receive KIMMTRAK. Your dedicated nurse case manager will help schedule an appointment at a location that is most convenient for you. They will also speak with your care team to make sure all of your information is shared with the appropriate people.

Does it cost anything to enroll in the KIMMTRAK CONNECT program?

No. The KIMMTRAK CONNECT program is free to patients who have a diagnosis of metastatic uveal melanoma and are receiving KIMMTRAK.

Is the personal information I give to KIMMTRAK CONNECT protected?

Yes. All information you provide is safe and secure. This includes the data on your enrollment form, as well as anything you share with your dedicated nurse case manager and KIMMTRAK CONNECT.

I prefer to be contacted by e-mail. Is this an option?

Yes. You can be contacted through e-mail, by text, or by phone. Your dedicated nurse case manager will provide highly customized support in a way that works best for you.

How do I get in contact with support groups?

Your dedicated nurse case manager can direct you to local, regional, and national support groups that address the unique needs of patients like you.

I live alone and need help with transportation to and from my treatment. What should I do?

Your dedicated nurse case manager can help you find ways to get to and from your appointments. These may include ride-share programs such as Uber and Lyft.

If you or your doctor have selected an infusion center to administer KIMMTRAK, your dedicated nurse case manager will check to see if the infusion center offers transportation.

I have received a bill for KIMMTRAK. What should I do?

If you have received a bill for KIMMTRAK from a hospital, a healthcare provider, or your insurance company, speak with your dedicated nurse case manager. They may be able to help you reduce your out-of-pocket costs.

I was just diagnosed with metastatic uveal melanoma. What should I do?

Talk to your doctor about getting a simple blood test to determine if KIMMTRAK might be right for you. If your doctor prescribes KIMMTRAK for you, enrolling in KIMMTRAK CONNECT is an important next step. We offer services and support tailored to you. If you or your loved ones have questions, we can help answer them. We can also help you find specialists and treatment centers.

Glossary of terms

Below is a list of terms you may read or hear when learning about KIMMTRAK and metastatic uveal melanoma.

CD3 T cell receptor

CD3 is a group of proteins found on your body's T cells that play a part in activating T cells so that they fight disease.

Cytokine (sigh-toe-kine) release syndrome

This is a side effect of immunotherapy. It happens when a large number of cytokines, substances that help direct your body's immune response, are released into the blood. Symptoms may include fever, tiredness or weakness, vomiting, chills, dizziness, light-headedness, headache, wheezing, and trouble breathing.

gp100

The gp100 molecule is a protein found in cells that produce melanin. These cells are called melanocytes. Melanocytes can be found in the skin and the eyes.

Human leukocyte (loo-ko-site) antigen, or HLA

HLA is a substance found on the surface of most cells in your body. It plays an important part in your body’s immune response.

Immune checkpoint inhibitor

This blocks proteins called checkpoints. Checkpoints are made by some types of cancer cells. They can prevent your body’s T cells from killing those cancer cells. By blocking those checkpoints, T cells can kill cancer cells more effectively.

Metastatic uveal (YOO-vee-uhl) melanoma

Metastatic uveal melanoma occurs when the cancer that starts in the eye spreads to other parts of the body.

Surveillance

Doctors sometimes use this approach to manage a patient’s disease. It means the condition is watched closely but is not treated unless there are changes in certain test results. Surveillance can find early signs that a disease such as cancer has come back. For patients with metastatic uveal melanoma, surveillance may include scans (MRI, PET, CT, X-ray) or blood tests.

T cell receptor

T cells help your body fight cancer. T cell receptors are proteins found on T cells. They help T cells fight disease by binding to certain proteins found on some cells, including cancer cells.

Tebentafusp-tebn

Tebentafusp-tebn is the non-brand name of KIMMTRAK.

Uveal (YOO-vee-uhl) melanoma

Uveal melanoma is a rare, but aggressive disease in which cancer cells form in the tissues of the eye. Signs of uveal melanoma can include blurred vision, perceived flashes of light, and other types of distorted vision.

Indication and Important Safety Information Including Boxed Warning

Usage

KIMMTRAK is a prescription medicine used to treat HLA-A*02:01-positive adults with uveal melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery or has spread.

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about KIMMTRAK?

KIMMTRAK can cause serious side effects that can be severe or life threatening and usually happen within the first three infusions, including:

  • Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS). Symptoms of CRS may include:
    • fever
    • tiredness or weakness
    • vomiting
    • chills
    • nausea
    • low blood pressure
    • dizziness and light-headedness
    • headache
    • wheezing and trouble breathing
    • rash

Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get any of these symptoms. Your healthcare provider will check for these problems during treatment with KIMMTRAK. Your healthcare provider may temporarily stop or completely stop your treatment with KIMMTRAK if you have severe side effects.

See "KIMMTRAK can cause other serious side effects" for more information.

Before receiving KIMMTRAK, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. KIMMTRAK may harm your unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider if you become pregnant during treatment with KIMMTRAK. For females who are able to become pregnant: For females who are able to become pregnant:
    • Your healthcare provider should do a pregnancy test before you start treatment with KIMMTRAK.
    • Use an effective form of birth control during treatment with KIMMTRAK and for at least 1 week after the last dose of KIMMTRAK.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if KIMMTRAK passes into your breast milk. Do not breastfeed during the treatment with KIMMTRAK and for at least 1 week after the last dose of KIMMTRAK.

Tell your healthcare provider about all medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

KIMMTRAK can cause other serious side effects, including:
  • Skin reactions. KIMMTRAK may cause skin reactions that require treatment. Tell your healthcare provider if you get symptoms of skin reactions—such as rash, itching, or skin swelling—that are severe and do not go away.
  • Abnormal liver blood tests. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your liver before you start KIMMTRAK and during treatment with KIMMTRAK. Tell your healthcare provider if you get symptoms of liver problems such as right-sided abdominal pain or yellowing of the skin or eyes.
The most common side effects of KIMMTRAK include:
  • cytokine release syndrome (CRS)
  • rash
  • fever
  • itching
  • tiredness
  • nausea
  • chills
  • stomach pain
  • swelling
  • low blood pressure (symptoms may
    include dizziness or light-headedness)
  • dry skin
  • headache
  • vomiting
  • abnormal liver blood tests

These are not all the side effects possible with KIMMTRAK.

Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

Please read the accompanying Patient Information Leaflet before you receive KIMMTRAK and discuss any questions you have with your healthcare provider.

Please see KIMMTRAK Patient Information.

Important Safety Information
Including Boxed Warning

What is the most important information I should know about KIMMTRAK?

KIMMTRAK can cause serious side effects that can be severe or life threatening and usually happen within the first three infusions, including Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS).

Usage

KIMMTRAK is a prescription medicine used to treat HLA-A*02:01-positive adults with uveal melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery or has spread.

Important Safety Information Including
Boxed Warning

What is the most important information I should know about KIMMTRAK?

KIMMTRAK can cause serious side effects that can be severe or life threatening and usually happen within the first three infusions, including Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS).